Culinary Arts and Food Service

Introduction to Local and Global Food

14 weeks Certificate

Overview

In an age of the 4000 km caesar salad and the 100 mile diet, with 800 million hungry people on Earth and over 1 billion overweight, understanding the “food system” is a hot item on the menu. How do we, and how should we eat for the 21st Century? How do we build the sustainable local and global food systems we want? This course explores these questions by following food’s circular journey – from the farm fields where heirloom and biotech seeds are sown; into chicken McNugget and artisanal cheese factories; out to A&P, farmers markets, and restaurants; onto our dinner tables, forks and taste buds; and back to the beginning via composters and landfills. It’s a wild mix, including issues like biotechnology, organic farming, globalization, climate change, peak oil, water scarcity, food security, obesity, hunger, the global food price crisis. At the centre of the course, and certificate program it serves as an introduction for, are the practical opportunities and challenges of making food system changes happen on local and global political, economic and ecological levels.

You may enroll in a Continuing Education course at Canadore College if you are 19 years of age or older or if you have earned an Ontario Secondary School Diploma/Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma or equivalent.

Standard Fee - $394.30

Senior Fee - $351.78

Speakers required.


Most college level courses require textbooks; textbooks are not included in the course fees. It is the student’s responsibility to purchase any required textbooks.

Textbooks are available at the Campus Shop for in class, Contact North, and iLearn/D2L courses. The Campus Shop does not carry most OntarioLearn textbooks. OntarioLearn textbooks can be purchased at www.textnet.ca.

Students may also purchase textbooks from a source of their choice, but the ISBN must match.

View Part-Time Program Booklist

Learning outcomes represent culminating demonstrations of learning and achievement. In addition, learning outcomes are interrelated and cannot be viewed in isolation of one another. As such, they should be viewed as a comprehensive whole. They describe performances that demonstrate that significant integrated learning by graduates of the program has been achieved.